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Tuesday, August 11, 2020 | History

7 edition of The iconography of the Canaanite gods Reshef and Baʻal found in the catalog.

The iconography of the Canaanite gods Reshef and Baʻal

late Bronze and Iron Age I periods (C 1500-1000 BCE)

by Izak Cornelius

  • 177 Want to read
  • 19 Currently reading

Published by University Press, Vandenhoeck & Ruprecht in Fribourg, Switzerland, Göttingen .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Rešep (Canaanite deity),
  • Baal (Deity),
  • Gods, Canaanite

  • Edition Notes

    Includes bibliographical references (p. 265-291)

    StatementIzak Cornelius.
    SeriesOrbis biblicus et orientalis ;, 140
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsBL1672.R47 C67 1994
    The Physical Object
    Pagination298, [19] p., [54] p. of plates :
    Number of Pages298
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL835245M
    ISBN 103525537751, 3727809833
    LC Control Number95110413
    OCLC/WorldCa32036951

    Resheph (Rašap, Rešef, Reshef; Canaanite/Hebrew ršp רשף) was a Canaanite deity of plague and Egyptian iconography Resheph is depicted wearing the crown of Upper Egypt surmounted in front by the head of a gazelle. He has links with Theban war god Montu and was thought of as a guardian deity in battle by many Egyptian pharaohs. Although the iconography . Ancient Man and His First Civilizations The Gods of Canaan/Phoenicia. The Phoenician era saw a shift in Canaanite religion. The larger pantheon became pushed to the side in favor of previously less important, singular deities who became or were already, the patron Gods of Cities.

    RESHEPH is another major god of the Canaanite religion who becomes a demonic figure in biblical literature. Resheph is known as the god of plague over much of the ancient Near East, in texts and artistic representations spanning more than a . surmounted in front by the head of a gazelle. He has links with Theban war god Montu and was thought of as a guardian deity in battle by many Egyptian pharaohs. Although the iconography of Resheph shares the gazelle with that of the Egyptian-Canaanite Shed, Izak Cornelius writes that "the rest of the attributes are totally different." According to myth, Resheph exerted a benign .

    V. The Hidden God, Victorious Gods, and the Blessing of Fertility: Iron Age I. The Amun Temple in gaza and the Widespread Presence of the Hidden God Gods in Triumph and Domination: Seth-Baal, Reshef, and Horus The Conqueror, Who Triumphs over His Enemies Goddess Idols, Lyre Players, and Female Mourners: Elements of Philistine Iconography. Reshef was later worshiped by the Egyptians during the New Kingdom era, around B.C. to B.C. "The scene depicts Reshef drawing his bow toward twelve enemies in varying degrees of collapse, and two kneeling, bound captives. Some have pointed beards, a feature typical of Asiatics in Egyptian iconography," the article stated.


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The iconography of the Canaanite gods Reshef and Baʻal by Izak Cornelius Download PDF EPUB FB2

The Iconography of the Canaanite Gods Reshef and Ba'al: Late Bronze and Iron Age I Periods (c BCE) (Orbis Biblicus et Orientalis) Find all the books, read about the author, and by: 9. The Iconography of the Canaanite Gods Reshef and Ba'al: Late Bronze and Iron Age I Periods (c BCE) by Izak Cornelius.

The Iconography of the Canaanite Gods and Reshef and Ba'al. Late Bronze and Iron Age O Period (c BCE). Published by Fribourg/G ttingen: University Press Fribourg/Vandenhoeck & Ruprecht () () ISBN ISBN /5(1).

The iconography of the Canaanite gods Reshef and Baʻal: Late Bronze and Iron Age I periods (C BCE) (Orbis biblicus et orientalis). Resheph (also Reshef and many other variants; Phoenician: 𐤓‬𐤔‬𐤐‬, ršp; Eblaite Rašap, Egyptian ršpw) was a deity associated with plague (or a personification of plague), war, and sometimes thunder in ancient Canaanite originally Eblaite and Canaanite god was then more famously adopted into ancient Egyptian religion in the late Bronze Age during the Eighteenth.

The Iconography of the Canaanite Gods Reshef and Ba'al: Late Bronze and Iron Age I Periods (c – BCE). Fribourg: University Press, Day, John. Yahweh and the Gods and Goddesses of Canaan. Sheffield: Sheffield Academic Press, Smith, Mark S.

An example is the conception of God as president of a court of the gods, bene'el, whether thought of as a divine guild or as the divine family, 'el here of course of a proper name, El (God) the King Paramount. The psalm in Deuteronomy 32 begins by rating Israel for her lapses from the faith and ends with the assurance of the destruction of her.

The Canaanites worshiped many gods and goddesses who, together, formed a council. El (“god”), the father of the other gods and humanity, was head of the council.

He lived in a cosmic paradise where the other gods came to see him. Baal (“master” or “lord”) also was known as Hadad. These Israelites spoke Hebrew, a Canaanite language, used various literary forms found in other parts of the West Semitic world, and often portrayed their God, Yahweh, with language commonly associated with the Canaanite storm god Baal (c.f.

Ps 29). Author: Michelle Paver; Publisher: Penguin ISBN: Category: Juvenile Fiction Page: View: DOWNLOAD NOW» International bestseller Michelle Paver sets the stage for an epic final battle in this riveting conclusion to Gods and Warriors, the Bronze Age adventure series Hylas has returned to his homeland, and the fate of the world rests on his shoulders: He must.

The Iconography Of The Canaanite Gods Reshef And Ba\Al: Late Bronze And Iron Age I Periods (C Bce) did not like it avg rating — /5.

The iconography of the Canaanite gods Reshef and Baʻal: late Bronze and Iron Age I periods (C BCE). The Hurrian goddess Hebat was worshiped in Jerusalem, and Baal was closely considered equivalent to the Hurrian storm god Teshub and the Hittite storm god, Tarhunt.

Canaanite divinities seem to have been almost identical in form and function to the neighboring Arameans to the east, and Baal Hadad and El can be distinguished amongst earlier Amorites, who at. For the Egyptian iconographic material, most valuable is Izak Cornelius, The Iconography of the Canaanite Gods Reshef and Ba'al: Late Bronze and Iron Age I Periods (c.

– bce) (Fribourg, Switzerland, and G ö ttingen, Germany, ). The Iconography of the Canaanite Gods Reshef and Baʻal: Late Bronze and Iron Izak Cornelius Limited preview -   In the second millennium B.C.E., El was replaced by Ba‘al as the chief god in the Canaanite pantheon, and in the Bible Asherah is often paired with Ba‘al (e.g., Judges2 Kings2 Kings ).

Indeed, of all the pagan gods, the Biblical authors’ strongest hostility is directed against Ba‘al. El is the father of all gods and the supreme leader of all the gods of the mountains.

That is why so much biblical literature describes Moses, Jesus, and others going up into the mountains to talk to him. In Canaanite literature El is pictured as an ancient, revered old man who likes to drink a lot and often gets drunk at parties. Reviews the book `The Iconography of the Canaanite Gods Reshef and Ba`al: Late Bronze and Iron Age I Periods (c BCE),' by Izak Cornelius.

Stories from Ancient Canaan (Book). Clifford, Richard J. // Journal of Biblical Literature;Dec79, Vol. 98 Issue 4, p The Iconography of the Canaanite Gods Reshef and Baʻal: Late Bronze and Iron Age I Periods (C BCE).

Fribourg, Switzerland: Göttingen: University Press, Richard, Suzanne. Near Eastern Archaeology: A Reader. Winona Lake, Ind.: Eisenbrauns, Nakhai, Beth Alpert. Archaeology and the Religions of Canaan and Israel.

Boston, MA. Izak (Sakkie) Cornelius (, University of Stellenbosch) is professor of ancient studies at the University of Stellenbosch (South Africa).

He is the author of The iconography of the Canaanite gods Reshef and Baal. Late Bronze and Iron Age I periods (c BCE) and several other works in ancient near eastern : Ebook.

Books 1. The Iconography of the Canaanite Gods Reshef and Baal. Late Bronze and Iron Age I Periods (c BCE) (Orbis Biblicus et Orientalis- ). Fribourg: University Press & Göttingen: Vandenhoeck & Ruprecht.

ISBN and 3- - 2. The Many Faces of the Goddess. The Iconography of the SyroPalestinian.found: New world encyclopedia, via WWW, January 8, (In the Bible, Baal (also rendered Baʻal) was an important Canaanite god, often portrayed as the primary enemy of the Hebrew God Yahweh.

The Semitic word "baal" (meaning "Lord") was also used to refer to various deities of the Levant. Many of the Biblical references to "baal" designate local deities identified with .In Abraham's story, the Canaanite god, who is the Possessor, Controller, Creator, Producer confronts the God of Abraham, who is also the God of Melchizedek, even the Most High God, the Possessor (El qoneh) of Heaven and Earth (Genesis 12).

Pharaoh, and all kings else, cede the day to Melchizedek and to Abraham.